Posts Tagged ‘integrity’

Daddy as a little boyMy dad was the first quintessential leader I encountered in life. He wasn’t perfect – none of us are – but who he was and how he lived his life was anchored to the principles of quintessential leadership.

In the years since Daddy’s death in 1998, I’ve met and or reconnected with many people who knew my dad well and one of the things I’ve consistently heard about him was that he was a good man, a kind man, and a gentle man with an open heart ready to serve and open ears and time ready to listen. (more…)

I recently have been going through the essays that George Orwell wrote.

I read these essays in college, but now they seem to have deeper meaning now as I look at the world and I look at us – those of us who claim to be leaders but who are not, having stolen the title with nothing to back it up, and those of us who are striving to be quintessential leaders, committed to that goal, and, yet, as mere humans often falling far short of it – and I see more of the things that get in our way, even if we are committed and trying, and if we’re not, what we can never overcome. (more…)

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.As today – January 16, 2017 – marks the United States’ federal observance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday (Dr. King’s actual birth date was January 15, 1929), it is a good time to review some of the quintessential leadership traits that Dr. King possessed and that we should be looking for and developing in our own quintessential leadership journeys. (more…)

Quintessential leadership is absent without a consistently stellar reputationSeth Godin’s blog post today is about reputation. The points he makes are well-stated, accurate, and something that we who are striving to be quintessential leaders should be thinking about all the time in what we say, what we do and who and what we are.

We can never be reminded of this too often, though.

How are we doing?

Quintessential Leaders Follow Through on Their CommitmentsIt seems that it’s much easier for us to give easy and voluminous lip service to committing to do something than it is for us to actually take the actions and efforts to follow through on commitments we’ve made.

Part of the reason is that we don’t take our verbal commitments very seriously. They’re easy to say and take so little time and they temporarily pacify whomever we are talking to. But the reality is that there is no real intent to follow through behind them.

Another part of the reason is that we tend to over-commit, even though we can’t possibly follow through on everything we commit to, because we want to please people or we don’t want to disappoint them.

And still another part of the reason is that our tendency to commit to doing things that we end up not following through on is to make ourselves look good in the eyes of others as being generous benefactors.

No matter what the reasons are why we don’t follow through on the many commitments we make every day, the fact that we don’t follow through puts us on the path of unquintessential leadership.

Why?

  1. Important things don’t get done when we don’t follow through on our commitments.
  2. People – perhaps a lot of people – suffer, sometimes greatly and needlessly, because we don’t follow through on our commitments.
  3. We model a poor example for all our life teams – which they will emulate, perpetuating the path of unquintessential leadership into the future – when we don’t follow through on our commitments.

Following Through on Commitments Distinguishes Quintessential Leaders From Everyone ElseBecause quintessential leaders strive to follow through on their commitments, it’s important to go behind the scenes to examine how they do it (what this looks like) in a world where the majority of people, including those in leadership positions, fail to follow through on their commitments.

Quintessential leaders follow through on their commitments by:

  1. Thinking carefully about what they commit themselves to do;
  2. Ensuring that they have all the resources they need to fulfill their commitments;
  3. Being selective about what they commit to (because their integrity and their examples to their life teams are always in focus, they are careful to preserve both all the time);
  4. Refusing to over-commit;
  5. Refusing to commit to things they don’t have the time, the ability, the authority, and the resources to fulfill;
  6. Ensuring active, prompt, and complete fulfillment of the commitments they actually make (this means being involved, following up, and staying active in the process until the commitment they’ve made is completed).

Quintessential leaders value quality over quantity. They also value substantive action over superfluous talk.

That is why quintessential leaders carefully choose – and have no problem saying “No” to things and people – what they commit themselves to and follow through with.

Quintessential leaders are also people who do the right things for the right reasons, striving for anonymity and being completely under the radar.

Unlike the many people who say they’ll do something so that they’ll look good to other people, yet they fail to follow through at all, quintessential leaders always ensure that their left hands don’t know what their right hands are doing.

As we look at our own leadership lives – wherever we are in life, we lead at least one team and our lives are living examples to everyone around us to either reject or emulate – we must ask ourselves about our commitments and our follow through.

  1. Do we make commitments and then fail to follow through?
  2. Do we give lip service to commitments, with no intent of doing anything?
  3. Do we over-commit?
  4. Do we make commitments just to look good to other people?
  5. What example are we setting personally with the commitments we make and our follow through on those commitments?

How are we doing?

unimitable unquintessential leadershipThe lack of a synchronized life of imitable authenticity among humans – and people in leadership positions – in what they say, who they are, and how they conduct every part of their lives is bemoaned almost constantly.

The reality is that what we do observe is an abundance of synchronized lives of not-to-be-imitated authenticity, more so now than ever before. 

We now live in a society where being fundamentally selfish, self-centered, and driven by power and greed – something often hidden or obscured from public view in times past – has become not only visible, but accepted, expected, and applauded. 

While some people in leadership positions posture with a public face of integrity, honesty, selflessness, transparency, and altruism with their words when their actions are the exact opposite (these are the ones who cause the bemoaning), most people in leadership positions now don’t try to hide how nefarious they are as people and in their leadership positions.

Bullying, cheating, one-upping, fighting, lying, treating people abominably, being perpetually profane and denigrating, and overall defective character among people in leadership positions is now considered admirable and the mark of strong leadership.

Are we who say we are striving to be quintessential leaders different? We should be. Increasingly, though, it seems that although we say we are different, in fact everything else about us says that we are less different that we purport to be.

Are we who say we're quintessential leaders in fact hypocrites?In other words, we are hypocrites, saying one thing about ourselves while the rest of our lives says the exact opposite. It seems that we have gotten comfortable lying to ourselves – and others – about ourselves.

When we live (and believe) a lie – saying one thing and doing and being something completely different – we are not quintessential leaders, but instead we are destroyers.

Most importantly, we destroy trust. With trust, we destroy credibility. When we lose trust and credibility, we destroy our teams. In every part of our lives.

Oh yes, the people around us may do – or pretend to do – what we tell them to, but it is not out of trust and respect.

For a few – and it’s a small few – of our teams, the reason is fear.

For most of our teams, though, it is a stopgap measure until – and they are scrambling to find the fastest exit – they can get as far away from us as possible. 

If we’re losing our teams in droves, as quintessential leaders (this implies we care and we don’t want to lose them – no effort means we were lying about being quintessential leaders to begin with) we need to ask ourselves the following questions.

Do we want to inspire fear in our teams? Do we want to threaten and coerce our teams into doing whatever we want or else? Do we want our communication to be profane, denigrating, disrespectful, and dismissive?

Are we willing to cheat – the end justifies the means – anywhere and everywhere in our lives to get what we want and/or to get ahead? Are we willing to throw other people under the bus to make ourselves look good? Are we willing to be dishonest (lying, stealing, faking) to either avoid consequences or to get more for ourselves?

Do we care about our teams or are they just expendable commodities that we use, abuse, and then throw away when we can’t use and abuse them anymore? Are we sycophants with people we see as useful or important and tyrants with everyone else?

Who are we really? Do we know? Do we care? Does it matter?

The people we are best at fooling are ourselves. Most of us, even those of us who are striving to be quintessential leaders, are not aware of the depth of our self-deception about who and what we really are on the inside.

Where are the disconnects in our lives?Today, I challenge each of us to take stock of ourselves, of our lives, and of the disconnects we make between what we say we are and what we actually are.

We all have disconnects in our lives. Quintessential leaders acknowledge that, become aware of theirs, and undertake the process of doing something about it.

That’s imitable authenticity and that is a repeatable step (we can’t do it once and believe we’re done – it must be a daily part of our lives) that will lead to a synchronized life that sets a positive, realistic, and credible example to all the teams in our lives.

Anything less is unacceptable for quintessential leaders.

How are we doing?