The Mysteries of Quintessential Leadership Revealed

Posted: March 24, 2011 in Quintessential Leadership
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

The word “leadership” is mysterious, powerful, and generally misunderstood as to how it applies to life. It is often used as a catch-all title to denote being in charge of a collective of things, people, and resources. And that is the first detour from the truth of what leadership – and quintessential leadership is.

I’ll break it down simply. We manage things. People manage themselves. Leaders have the gift of knowing how to properly manage things – time, money, resources – and give their teams the parameters, tools, and opportunities that will naturally invest them in the activities of the company, division, or department so that they manage themselves in a way that positively contributes to the continued success of the unit. Quintessential leaders go a step further. Not only are they successful managers and skilled guides within their direct areas of responsibility, but they are also in tune with the larger organizational vision and work successfully with other business units to ensure that vision is attained.

Leaders are always managers, but managers are not always leaders. In fact, most people who have the title of “Manager of” today are not leaders and have no idea how to be. This is because promotion to management positions has been the traditional way of recognizing an individual’s competency in his or field or rewarding an employee for achievement. Most employees promoted to management positions eventually fail because they don’t understand nor do they have the soft skills (interpersonal especially) of leadership needed to succeed. A team that doesn’t buy into to a “manager” will ensure that he/she is kicked to the curb sooner rather than later. The usual complaint heard is about a lack of people/interpersonal/relationship skills.

There are good leaders who are good managers. They are rare. Even rarer is the quintessential leader who is also a quintessential manager. How do you recognize one? How do you become one?

This blog will show examples of excellent leadership and the total absence of leadership and the results of both, with a thoughtful and straightforward look at the components that led to success and the components that led to failure. This blog invites each reader to change, to grow, perhaps to fine-tune. It also should deepen your analytical skills when assessing the big picture when things are working well and when they are not. It should give you the courage to put the brakes on to prevent probable train wrecks within areas you oversee.

It will require discernment, honesty, and the ability to look within and without without fear. It will require a willingness to do something radically different from the status quo and it will require thinking outside of the box. It is not for the faint-hearted, but the courageous will take these balls and run with them and see dramatic successes take the place of impending disasters.

Remember, the process starts with you, and the example – leadership – you exhibit will be the greatest force for change around you. Words are just words, but actions reveal the truth about you. Make sure that your actions and your words match because no one will pay attention if they don’t. It’s not enough to say you are a leader; everything you do must confirm that you are.

Let’s see what a leader looks like.

Comments
  1. […] last article recommendation this week, written by Kristina Lacida, highlights, as “The Mysteries of Quintessential Leadership Revealed” discusses in detail, the differences between being a “boss” and being a […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s